Texas Deer Association holds successful convention


Written by Conor Harrison, LSON. Photo by TDA

Members of the Texas Deer Association gathered last weekend in San Antonio for their annual convention with the cloud of Chronic Wasting Disease hanging heavy over the industry.

Up until a few days before the convention on Aug. 13, TDA were unsure what the future held for their industry.

But, on Aug. 11, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Animal Health Commission’s CWD Task Force released the Deer Breeder Movement Standards Plan.

Many members weren’t thrilled with the amount of testing requirements, but the overall attitude of the attendees was positive. The vast majority of breeders and facilities which release deer were back in business.

Attendance to the convention was high and the auction was a huge success, following up on last year’s record total.

Patrick Tarlton was introduced as the new executive director, replacing Karl Kinsel and his more than a decade of service to the organization.

Bob Price also took over Chase Clark’s former duties as new TDA president.

Read more about the convention in the next issue of Lone Star Outdoor News, out Aug. 28.

Copyright 2015 Lone Star Outdoor News . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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Lili Sams

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Hey y'all! I'm a sweet tea lovin' girl from the Lone Star State. I am recent graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, currently living and working in the Big Apple. When I'm not in the big city you can find me riding a 4 wheeler and hunting with my papa.

One Response

  1. terry

    Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion and how to put lipstick on a pig and take her to the dance in Texas

    Under Texas law, though, breeder deer belong to the state, not the permittee. See, e.g., TEX. PARKS & WILD. CODE §§ 1.011 (“All wild animals . . . inside the borders of this state are the property of the people of this state.”); 43.364 (“All breeder deer . . . are under the full force of the laws of [Texas] pertaining to deer . . . .”). While a permittee may have possession of the breeder deer, the deer are only “held under a permit[.]” Id. § 43.351. Nowhere do the statutes or regulations state that breeder deer become the property of a permit holder.4 Regardless, even if they did give ownership of breeder deer to permit holders, the Andertons were not permit holders when the deer were killed.


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